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The actual name of the British Royal Family

Did you know that the British Royal Family is actually the Mountbatten-Windsor family? That’s the name of some of the descendents of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip.

Prince William, his wife Kate Middleton the Duchess of Cambridge and their two children (Prince George and Princess Charlotte) all have the Mountbatten-Windsor surname as does William’s brother Harry and their father, Prince Charles.

The name Mountbatten is German, from the princely Battenberg family in Hesse, Germany. The name was adopted in World War I by Battenbergs living in England due to rising anti-German sentiment with the British public.

According to Wikipedia:

Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark, the consort of Queen Elizabeth II, adopted the surname of Mountbatten from his mother’s family in 1947, although he is a member of the House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg by patrilineal descent. Lady Louise Mountbatten became Queen Consort of Sweden, after having married Gustaf VI Adolf of Sweden

That is to say, if you weren’t already aware, the modern British Royal Family is actually a multi-national dynasty, consolidating power from all over Europe into Britain over decades.

Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh and husband of Queen Elizabeth II, is the son of Princess Alice of Battenberg and grandson of the 1st Marquess of Milford Haven (a title created for Prince Louis of Battenberg after he and his family fled Germany for Britain and renounced their German citizenship).

Prince Philip took the name Mountbatten after he became a naturalized British subject. He went on to marry Princess Elizabeth, the daughter of King George VI in 1947. When his new wife became Queen Elizabeth II in 1952, there was some controversy over which dynasty the descendants of Philip and Elizabeth would belong. Elizabeth descended from the House of Windsor, named after her grandfather King George V and ultimately Prime Minister Winston Churchill had to raise the matter to Parliament, at which point it was decreed that the name of the Royal House would remain Windsor in perpetuity.